Trinity Services, Inc
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News + Blog

  • Individual Placement and Support Program helps people recovering from mental illness achieve workplace success, break through barriers of stigma

    Sep 15, 2017

    NAPERVILLE, IL — When a person is traveling the road to recovery from a severe mental illness, oftentimes, stigma and a lack of understanding from others can put up roadblocks that can be difficult to navigate.

    Trinity Services’ Individual Placement and Support Program works to help people successfully navigate those roadblocks by assisting them in obtaining and keeping employment.

    After working with Trinity’s IPS Program for just six months, Jean acquired a job she loves with Aramark. She prepares and serves food at an elementary school near her home, ensuring the students stay nourished, happy and healthy.

    Jean needed some support gaining employment because of her mental illness. Through working with IPS Program Supervisor Katie Reyes, Jean learned skills like how to cope with stress on the job, how to manage tasks and how to keep composure when something frustrating happens.

    Jean has also learned to look at work, itself, as a coping mechanism for anything that might be stressful or upsetting in her personal life.

    Since gaining employment in early May, Jean has built upon these skills and impressed her supervisors, earning their praise for the work she does, and for the joy she brings to her coworkers and the students she serves.

    “At long last, I’m making some money,” Jean said. “My goal in the long run is independence, and I’m on my way there.”

    Jean lives in a group setting where she takes turns with her housemates preparing meals, cleaning and taking care of other housekeeping duties.

    She works three hours each day, Monday-Friday, at the school, serving five different lunch periods. Her favorite part of the job is getting to interact with the students and brighten their days through delicious meals.

    In her free time, Jean volunteers with her church and attends community events.

    Jean said she intends to keep working with Aramark after her time with the IPS Program comes to a close, once she has successfully completed 90 days of employment. However, services will always be available to help her with coping skills and any other concerns she may have once she has completed the program.

    “A lot of people want an opportunity to do a job,” Jean said. “I want to create awareness of mental health issues and diversity so that there is a chance for everybody to work.”

    For more information about Trinity Services’ IPS Program, call (815) 462-3652.

    Trinity Services, Inc. is a 67-year-old, nonsectarian, nonprofit organization dedicated to helping children and adults with developmental disabilities and mental illness flourish and live full and abundant lives. Trinity serves more than 3,500 people in 31 communities in Will, Cook, DuPage, Grundy, Peoria, Jackson, Madison and St. Clair counties, and Reno, Nevada. To learn more, visit www.trinity-services.org.

    Jean
    Jean prepares lunch at an elementary school in Naperville, through her job with Aramark, which she obtained with help from Trinity Services.

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  • Trinity Services honors direct support professionals for their dedication during DSP Recognition Week 2017

    Sep 13, 2017

    NEW LENOX, IL — At Trinity Services, independent living coaches — also known as direct support professionals — are the backbone of the organization, working to help people with developmental disabilities and mental illness achieve their goals and live full, abundant lives.

    Their tireless dedication to the people they support and the outstanding, compassionate care they provide is worth honoring today and every day.

    For Direct Support Professional Recognition Week, Sept. 10-16, Trinity Services is calling attention to the valuable work independent living coaches at the organization do each day and to the importance of recruiting and retaining talented, caring staff members to provide people with disabilities the support they need.

    At Trinity Services, the DSP position is titled “independent living coach” because the essential efforts of these staff members center around coaching people — teaching, instructing and helping them develop skills for the future.

    ILCs are responsible for helping people with everyday tasks, such as cooking and cleaning, but their assistance is also key to helping people achieve goals like managing their finances or independently taking public transportation.

    The work ILCs do is vital. Beyond ensuring that the people they serve have all of their basic needs met, ILCs ensure people are fully integrated into their communities, have strong relationships with others, are respected and treated fairly, and much more. 

    For DSP Recognition Week, Gov. Bruce Rauner signed a statewide proclamation to “recognize and celebrate the contributions of direct support professionals that help strengthen our communities by fostering greater inclusion for persons with disabilities” and to officially proclaim the week in Illinois.

    “We thank independent living coaches for all the care, compassion, dedication and effort they put into supporting the people they serve,” said Art Dykstra, Executive Director of Trinity Services. “Their work is vital and immensely valuable, ensuring people with disabilities are flourishing."

    To find out more about the work ILCs do, and to apply to become an ILC at Trinity Services, visit www.trinity-services.org/ILC.

    Trinity Services, Inc. is a 67-year-old, nonsectarian, nonprofit organization dedicated to helping children and adults with developmental disabilities and mental illness flourish and live full and abundant lives. Trinity serves more than 3,500 people in 31 communities in Will, Cook, DuPage, Grundy, Peoria, Jackson, Madison and St. Clair counties, and Reno, Nevada. To learn more, visit www.trinity-services.org.

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  • Stewardship

    Sep 13, 2017

    Another characteristic of Servant Leadership is stewardship, defined as “holding something in trust for another person.” There are many levels of trust and stewardship at Trinity–from the corporate Board of Directors to the individual employee. 

    Stewardship means that we are aware of our resources and assets and how we use them. It certainly includes our financial resources whether it be third party payments, grants or charitable giving. Also included is the husbandry of such resources as our buildings, vehicles, equipment, office supplies and furniture. It also extends to how we maintain our group homes and day programs. Responsible stewardship manifests itself when we speak up because we need new chairs or necessary repairs. It includes little things like taking in the hose and garden tools before winter and making sure that windows are closed when the air conditioner is on. 

    We take good care of what we have because we are accountable. We have many levels of accountability at Trinity, including the people we serve and their families. Trinity’s Board of Directors, our supervisors, friends and donors, accrediting and regulatory bodies, etc. First of all, however, we have to be accountable to our collective sense of purpose and corporate values.

    Stewardship operates best when we behave as owners but recognize the fact that we aren’t. It occurs when we are found faithful. Stewardship means that our practices are cost effective and that we use good judgment in purchasing goods and services. We are not wasteful. Stewardship also means that we take care of such things as our reputation as an organization. In addition, it refers to how we spend our time and pursue our opportunities. Stewardship doesn’t just occur automatically, it involves people acting responsibly and consciously.

    Good stewardship generates trust, a quality that is a very important aspect of any relationship. Within an organization trust is as important as love is in a marriage. We work most effectively when we feel that we are trusted and when we can trust those around us. At Trinity, we believe in trusting each other until shown otherwise. We also believe in fostering a workplace where it is okay to ask questions. It is through questioning the whys of an existing system that leads us to make suggestions for improving it.

    NOTE: This is Part 7 of a 10-part series on Trinity's Core Values.
    To read Part 1 on Servant Leadership, click here.
    To read Part 2 on Serving and Supporting, click here.
    ​To read Part 3 on Honest and Open Communication, click here.
    To read Part 4 on Discretionary Effort, click here.
    To read Part 5 on Thinking Ahead and Following Through, click here.
    To read Part 6 on Collaboration, click here.

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  • Collaboration

    Sep 06, 2017

    Cooperation can be defined as “being willing to work with others,” as well as “wanting to work jointly with others.” Collaboration is about working together. “Willing to and wanting to” are clearly on the same spectrum but once again, there’s the added dimension of feeling and motivation when we are collaborating. We get much more done when we collaborate than when we work as individuals–assuming we stay on task and work within established time frames. There are many times in organizations when collaboration is more important than individual leadership.

    Collaboration occurs among direct support staff, team leaders, coordinators, middle managers and directors. It happens when they do committee work and training sessions. Collaborative projects can also occur when team members are apart but working for the same goal, such as carrying out an objective related to a treatment or service plan, implementing an organizational policy or procedure, communicating important information regarding a person receiving services or simply sharing helpful facts. Collaboration is truly a source of organizational strength.

    The underlying attitude in the approach comes from a desire to be helpful to others, recognizing that we accomplish more when our efforts are coordinated and in harmony. Working collaboratively is much more of a challenge than when we work on our own. The fact is, each member of the team is interdependent. We are not individual employees just carrying out our assigned duties; we are part of a bigger and more rewarding effort.

    On some occasions people use the word teamwork to describe the goal of every staff person working together. At Trinity, we have teams meet in an attempt to reach consensus on how we can best support the people we serve in reaching their goals. Problems that arise must be solved through joint efforts, not individually.  The team collaborates so that every person on the team knows exactly what goals the person is striving for and how we can best support the person in achieving them.

    Individuals working in collaboration are working in partnership, that is, engaging and cooperating, suggesting and encouraging. The willingness to listen openly to other team members and consider new ideas is imperative. Collaboration and leadership are the book ends of Trinity’s “Everything Counts” model of organizational performance.

    NOTE: This is Part 6 of a 10-part series on Trinity's Core Values.
    To read Part 1 on Servant Leadership, click here.
    To read Part 2 on Serving and Supporting, click here.
    ​To read Part 3 on Honest and Open Communication, click here.
    To read Part 4 on Discretionary Effort, click here.
    To read Part 5 on Thinking Ahead and Following Through, click here.
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Upcoming Events

  • An Evening of Holiday Music — Fourth Annual Concert Gala

    Please join us for "An Evening of Holiday Music" at our Fourth Annual Concert Gala at 6 p.m. Friday, Dec. 1, at Butterfield Country Club in Oak Brook to support our mission to help people with disabilities and mental illness flourish and live full and abundant lives.

    Click here to purchase tickets, to purchase a program book ad or to sponsor the event.

    This showcase of holiday music paired with dinner and fantastic company is a wonderful way to kick off the holiday season. 

    This year's event features the Western Springs School for Talent Education Allegro!!! Violin Ensemble.

    Tickets are $140 per person. Call (815) 717-3750 or email sladislas@trinity-services.org to find out more about how you can help with the event.


    Sponsorship Opportunities:
    Winter Wonderland - $5,000
    Full-page color ad in the program book
    Business logo posted on Trinity Services' website
    Prominent recognition at event
    Eight complimentary tickets
    Mention on social media

    Sleigh Bells - $4,000
    Full-page color ad in the program book
    Business name on Trinity Services' website
    Prominent recognition at event
    Six complimentary tickets
    Mention on social media

    Boughs of Holly - $2,000
    Full-page B&W ad in the program book
    Business name on Trinity Services' website
    Prominent recognition at event
    Four complimentary tickets
    Mention on social media

    Mistletoe - $2,000
    Half-page B&W ad in the program book
    Business name on Trinity Services' website
    Prominent recognition at event
    Two complimentary tickets
    Mention on social media

    Program Book Advertisement Opportunities:
    Full-page color $1,000 (7.5” W x 9.75” H)
    Full-page B&W $500 (7.5” W x 9.75” H)
    1/2-page B&W $250 (7.5” W x 4.875” H)
    1/4-page B&W $200 (3.75” W x 4.875” H)
    1/8-page business card/celebration B&W $100 (3.75”W x 2.4375” H)
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